PAST BOOK CLUBS

 

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Join us at the end of May 2019 to discuss Amanda Lewis and John Diamond’s Despite the Best Intentions: How Racial Inequality Thrives in Good Schools — a must-read for integrating parents!

Through five years’ worth of interviews and data-gathering at Riverview, John Diamond and Amanda Lewis have created a rich and disturbing portrait of the achievement gap that persists more than fifty years after the formal dismantling of segregation. As students progress from elementary school to middle school to high school, their level of academic achievement increasingly tracks along racial lines, with white and Asian students maintaining higher GPAs and standardized testing scores, taking more advanced classes, and attaining better college admission results than their black and Latino counterparts. Most research to date has focused on the role of poverty, family stability, and other external influences in explaining poor performance at school, especially in urban contexts. Diamond and Lewis instead situate their research in a suburban school, and look at what factors within the school itself could be causing the disparity. Most crucially, they challenge many common explanations of the ‘racial achievement gap,’ exploring what race actually means in this situation, and why it matters.

Your Homework:

  • read the book Despite the Best Intentions — and especially Chapter 5 on Opportunity Hoarding. Seriously.
  • &/or listen to the Integrated Schools podcast interview with Dr. Lewis

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February 2019

Mothers of Massive Resistance (Elizabeth McRae)

Join us at the end of February to discuss Elizabeth McRae’s compelling history of how white women have ‘tended the gardens of segregation’. For this February Book Club, we are thrilled to have Peter Piazza, Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Equity facilitating the discussions (you also know him from the School Desegregation Notebook and the great news round-ups he shares with Integrated Schools!).

“Examining racial segregation from 1920s to the 1970s, Mothers of Massive Resistance explores the grassroots workers who maintained the system of racial segregation and Jim Crow. For decades in rural communities, in university towns, and in New South cities, white women performed myriad duties that upheld white over black: censoring textbooks, denying marriage certificates, deciding on the racial identity of their neighbors, celebrating school choice, canvassing communities for votes, and lobbying elected officials. They instilled beliefs in racial hierarchies in their children, built national networks, and experimented with a color-blind political discourse. Without these mundane, everyday acts, white supremacist politics could not have shaped local, regional, and national politics the way it did or lasted as long as it has.”

Your assignment: